Slide background
Slide background
Slide background

All Voters (and potential voters) Matter

By | Uncategorized | No Comments

Recently, some one told me “in order for a Democrat to win in Texas, we really don’t need to turn anyone into a Democrat, we just need to get our currently registered Democrats to vote”.  Now, I understand campaign math and looking and numbers and analyzing what it takes to get to the number needed to win.  However, I vehemently disagree with any kind of thinking that would let us think for a second that we don’t need to be reaching out to every independent, unregistered, and yes, even conservative voters to tell them what we Democrats are about.  We can’t just sit back and assume that women will vote Democrat, if they vote at all.  Hell, every single Republican woman in the Texas House voted against the Equal Pay Act last session.  We also cannot sit back and assume that all immigrants will vote Democrat.  Not all immigrants think that immigration is their priority issue.  I believe that an introduction to civic engagement and voting can’t be “political” at all.  Citizens are tired of Democrat vs. Republican.  Their ears perk up when they discuss issues that affect their daily lives – their children, their jobs, their businesses, their neighborhoods.  I believe that the Texas Organizing Project  has it right.  Engage voters on the issues that affect them, instead of talking about campaigns, candidates, endorsements, donations, and polls.  I’m excited about the groundwork on a community level that Texas Organizing Project is laying that will eventually support the political infrastructure that the Texas Democratic Party and the local County parties are putting into place to prepare for a bright Texas future.  With all the excitement going on this year, I hope we see this adventure as not something that ends on November 4, 2014, but a foundation for all the good work to come in 2015 and beyond.

Children and Culture

By | Uncategorized | No Comments

IMG_0637My children are halfsies. I am from Taiwan and my husband is a very white guy from Texas. I’ve noticed that most mixed people who are half Caucasian tend to relate heavily with the ethnic side of their mix. For example, President Obama identifies more heavily as an African American. Many of my friends who are half Asian still identify themselves with their Asian side. I have no idea what my children will choose to own, but I have been fierce about ensuring their understanding of their Taiwanese heritage, even though I shunned most of it for much of my childhood. I have been militant about Chinese school, eating roasted duck, and properly addressing adults in the culturally appropriate manner. I dream that my children will speak Mandarin even better than I. I hope that their generation is the one that will get the best of both worlds, take the great parts of their American and their Asian cultures and build a life that honors both. In a world that changes before my eyes, I hope that the richness of their culture, ancestry and traditions will be an anchor for them.